Kaye Adams: Who is the Strictly Come Dancing 2022 contestant and why is she famous?

‘Pray for me,’ said the journalist and TV presenter

Strictly Come Dancing 2022: The celebrity line-up so far

Grab your partner by the hand... it’s time for Strictly Come Dancing again!

The hit BBC reality series is back for a landmark 20th series, with 15 new celebrities down to show off their moves on the dancefloor.

Among the roster this year are TV presenters, athletes, and pop stars. You can check out the full line-up here.

One of the contestants competing for the Glitterball trophy this year is Kaye Adams. She is coupled up with Kai Widdrington.

But who is Adams, and what has she said about appearing on Strictly?

Adams is a journalist and TV and radio presenter, best known for her anchoring role on ITV’s Loose Women.

Having started out as a news presenter, Adams has gone on to work in a number of diverse roles for different broadcasters.

Earlier this year, she launched a new podcast called How To Be 60 with Kaye Adams.

Ahead of going on Strictly, she asked viewers to “pray for me!”.

Explaining why she chose to go on the show, she said: “This is the last year of my fifties. It would be easy to say no and you go through all of these doubts in your head. And then you think that Strictly is a phenomenon, and it’s beloved by everyone. It’s an incredible experience.

“Despite the fact that I can’t dance, I’ve always had a little thing in the back of my head when I see people dancing, and I envy it to a certain extent.”

Strictly Come Dancing continues Saturday 24 September at 6.45pm on BBC One.

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