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Social Security Supplemental Income 2022 – Millions of Americans get $841 direct payment in DAYS – when to expect check

Difference between SSI and SSD explained
How much SSI pay will I get in 2022?
How much can you earn in 2022 and qualify for SSI?
Will SSI claimants get a fourth stimulus check?

MILLIONS of Americans will get the latest round of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit payments in just days.

Around eight million individuals will get the benefits, which help disabled adults and children as well as seniors over the age of 65, on Friday, July 1.

Every month on the first, the Social Security Administration (SSA) distributes SSI funds.

The average SSI claimant gets $621 per month in benefits this year, thanks to a 5.9 percent increase in the cost-of-living adjustment.

The maximum monthly payment per person is $841.

For couples, the maximum benefit is $1,261 a month, or $15,136.93 on an unrounded annual basis.

Read our Supplemental Security Income live blog for the latest news and updates...

  • Aurielle Weiss

    What happens if you qualify for both SSI and SSDI?

    As long as you meet the eligibility requirements for SSI and SSDI – then you could qualify for both.

    The average SSI average benefit is $621 per month this year, an increase of $34 from 2021. This equals $7,452 each year.

    The monthly maximum for SSI is $841 per month for an individual in 2022 or about $10,092 a year.

    As far as SSDI goes, the amount you receive is a bit more complicated.

    The benefit amount will depend on the age you became disabled, your employment history (including the average amount of income you once earned), and period of eligibility.

    And keep in mind, SSDI counts as income for SSI purposes. 

  • Aurielle Weiss

    What is SSI?

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a government program that assists persons who are unable to earn enough money on their own. 

    Adults with disabilities, children with disabilities, and those aged 65 and over are eligible.

    Individuals with sufficient job experience may be eligible for SSI payments in addition to disability or retirement benefits. 

    Likewise, individuals receive different amounts depending on their other sources of income and where they live.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    How SSI amounts are determined

    For the year 2022, the maximum monthly federal payments are $841 for an eligible individual, $1,261 for an eligible individual with an eligible spouse, and $421 for an essential person.

    In general, monthly amounts for the following year are calculated by multiplying the current year’s unrounded yearly amounts by the COLA effective in January of the following year.

    The new unrounded sums are then divided by 12 and rounded down to the next lower multiple of $1.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Four 401k mistakes that cost you thousands

    Many retirees rely on their 401k during retirement but could be missing out on savings because of a few common mistakes.

    The four mistakes are:

    • Ignoring tax liabilities
    • Employer matching
    • Allocating your funds properly
    • Keep your contributions consistent
  • Aurielle Weiss

    Social Security rules for divorcees, part five

    Getting married again may affect your Social Security benefits.

    Thankfully, remarried couples do not need to worry about retirement benefits as those will not be affected.

    However, if you are the divorced spouse of someone who dies, you may be eligible for benefits the same as a widow or widower, provided that your marriage lasted 10 years or longer.

    If you remarry after 60, or 50 for those with disabilities, the remarriage will not affect your eligibility for survivor’s benefits.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Social Security rules for divorcees, part four

    If your ex was born before January 2, 1954, and has reached full retirement age, they can choose to receive only the divorced spouse’s benefits, delaying their own retirement benefit until a later time.

    If your ex’s birthday is January 2, 1954, or later, the option to take only one benefit at full retirement age expires.

    If your ex-spouse files for one benefit, they’ll in fact be filing for all retirement or spousal benefits.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Social Security rules for divorcees, part three

    According to the SSA, if you have been divorced for at least two continuous years, your ex-spouse is eligible to receive retirement benefits on your record even if you have not applied yet. 

    However, if they are eligible for their own retirement benefits, Social Security will pay for that amount first.

    If your benefits are higher, your ex will also get an additional amount from your record, ensuring that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Social Security rules for divorcees, part two

    The maximum spousal benefit is 50 percent of whatever your ex-spouse will collect at their full retirement age (FRA).

    If you retire at your FRA in 2022, your maximum monthly benefit is $3,345.

    This means that your ex-partner would be able to get up to $1,672.50 per month.

    It’s important to note that an ex-spouse claiming benefits on your record will not reduce the amount you receive yourself.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Social Security rules for divorcees

    Ex-spouses are eligible to receive benefits on your record if they fall under a set number of categories.

    These include:

    • Your marriage lasted 10 years or longer.
    • Your ex-spouse is unmarried.
    • Your ex-spouse is 62 or older.
    • The benefit that your ex-spouse is entitled to receive based on their own work is less than the benefit they would receive based on your work.
    • You are entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits.
  • Aurielle Weiss

    States with no state supplemental payments

    Some states pay and administer their own supplemental payments, in addition to the federal SSI monthly payment.

    However, the following five states have no supplement:

  • Aurielle Weiss

    How to apply for survivors benefits, part four

    To apply for parent’s benefits, the Social Security Administration states that you need to prove your eligibility by providing the following documents:

    • Death certificate of deceased child
    • Your birth certificate
    • Evidence of your US citizenship or lawful alien status
    • Proof of US military discharge papers (if you had military service before 1968)
    • Your W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns for the previous year
  • Aurielle Weiss

    How to apply for survivors benefits, part three

    To apply for mother’s or father’s benefits, the Social Security Administration states that you need to prove your eligibility by providing the following documents:

    • Evidence of worker’s death
    • Your birth certificate or other documents that verify your birth
    • Evidence of your US citizenship or lawful alien status
    • Proof of US military discharge papers
    • Your W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns for the previous year
    • Marriage certificate
    • Final divorce decree (if you are applying as a surviving divorced father or mother)
    • Birth certificate of the child
  • Aurielle Weiss

    How to apply for survivors benefits, part two

    According to the Social Security Administration, to apply for widows/widowers or surviving divorced spouse’s benefits, you need to prove your eligibility by providing the following documents:

    • Evidence of the worker’s death
    • Your birth certificate or other documents that verify your birth
    • Evidence of your US citizenship or lawful alien status
    • Proof of US military discharge papers (if you had military service before 1968)
    • Your W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns for the previous year
    • Final divorce decree (if you are applying as a surviving divorced partner)
    • Marriage certificate
  • Aurielle Weiss

    How to apply for survivors benefits, part one

    According to the Social Security Administration, to apply for child’s benefits, you need to prove that the child is eligible for benefits by providing these documents:

    • Proof of the worker’s marriage to the child’s natural or adoptive parent if the child is the worker’s stepchild
    • The child’s birth certificate or other proof of birth or adoption
    • Proof of the child’s US citizenship or lawful alien status if the child was not born in the US
    • W-2 forms and/or self-employment tax returns if the child had earnings the previous year
    • If the worker is deceased, proof of the worker’s death and US military discharge papers
  • Aurielle Weiss

    Types of survivors benefits

    According to the Social Security Administration, there are five types of survivors benefits:

    • Child’s Benefits
    • Widows/Widowers or Surviving Divorced Spouse’s Benefits
    • Mother’s or Father’s Benefits (Only if you can show proof that you have a child below the age of 16 or disabled)
    • Parent’s Benefits (Only if you can show proof that you were dependent on your child before he or she died)
    • Lump-Sum Death Payment
  • Aurielle Weiss

    Survivors benefits explained

    According to the Social Security Administration, Social Security survivors benefits are paid to widows, widowers, and dependents of eligible workers.

    As a result, your family members may receive survivors benefits when you die, only if you were working and paying into Social Security.

    However, you are eligible to receive survivors benefits when a family member dies, based on their earnings.

    It should however be noted that the deceased family member should have worked long enough to qualify for benefits.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    How to apply for the Affordable Connectivity Program

    There are two ways to claim your discount:

    • Apply online and getinternet.gov to find participating broadband providers.
    • Contact a participating broadband provider to learn about their application process

    There are over 1,300 providers nationwide participating in the program and once enrolled, eligible households must contact a participating broadband provider to select their service plan.

    To learn more you can visit fcc.gov/ACP or call a support center at 877-384-2575.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    SSI claimants eligible for internet service subsidy

    The Affordable Connectivity Program is a new program offering high-speed, fiber-to-the-home internet service.

    Eligible households will be given $30 monthly discounts.

    Qualifying households can receive the discount is:

    • Total income is at or below 200% of the federal poverty level
    • If a resident of the household uses: SNAP, Medicaid, SSI, WIC, free or reduced lunch or school breakfast program, Federal Public Housing Assistance, Veterans Pension, Survivor Benefits, and Pell Grant.

    Eligible households will also receive a one-time $100 discount on select computers or tablets.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Benefits available to SSI claimants

    According to the Social Security Administration, SSI recipients may receive aid from other programs.

    The five programs SSI claimants may get are:

    • Medicaid
    • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
    • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
    • Medicaid for children
    • Social Security Disability Income
  • Aurielle Weiss

    What is Temporary Assistance for Needy Families?

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) gives cash grants to states.

    The monthly grants are worth over $1,000 and help needy families cover the cost of bills, housing, and child care.

    TANF gives states the flexibility to determine TANF eligibility rules and to set TANF payment amounts.

    According to the SSA, a household receiving TANF will only pay SSI benefits to the blind, disabled or elderly.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Can you work while receiving benefits?

    Those receiving Social Security benefits while working must follow strict limits.

    Payments for either program will stop if Social Security finds you are earning a substantial wage.

    Americans who earn an income of more than $1,350 a month, may be at risk of losing their current benefits.

    This is because Social Security defines a substantial wage, or substantial gainful activity (SGA), as earning more than $1,350 a month.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Veteran retirees may be exempt from taxes

    A newly passed bill in the South Carolina General Assembly would make all military retirement income exempt from South Carolina income taxes.

    At the state level, the bill was passed by both the House and the Senate and it may be an incentive for veterans to relocate to their state.

    According to the South Carolina Department of Veterans’ Affairs, out of the 400,000 military veterans residing in South Carolina, nearly 40,000 veterans would benefit from this bill if approved.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Types of income for SSI, part two

    Unearned Income: all income that is not earned such as Social Security benefits, pensions, State disability payments, unemployment benefits, interest income, dividends, and cash from friends and relatives.

    In-Kind Income: food, shelter, or both that you get for free or for less than its fair market value.

    Deemed Income: income from your spouse with whom you live, your parent(s) with whom you live, or your sponsor.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Types of income for SSI

    The SSA describes income is any item an individual receives in cash or that can be used for food or shelter.

    The four types of income include:

    Earned Income: net earnings from self–employment, certain royalties, honoraria, and sheltered workshop payments.

  • Aurielle Weiss

    Claimants can apply for SNAP and SSI

    Those who apply for SSI can also apply for your state’s SNAP program at the same time.

    SNAP benefit amount depends on your household income and size while the basic monthly SSI payment for 2022 is the same nationwide, $841 for one person or $1,261 for a couple.

    For those applying for SSI or already receiving SSI, they will help you:

    • Complete your SNAP application over the phone at 1-800-772-1213, or TTY 1-800-325-0778 if you’re deaf or hard of hearing
    • Complete the application in person if you have a scheduled appointment
    • Mail you a SNAP application if requested
    • Send your completed application to your local SNAP office for you
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